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The rhetoric of the royal chamber in late medieval London, York and Coventry

Liddy, C.

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Abstract

In the late medieval period several English cities claimed the distinction of being a royal chamber: London and York referred to themselves as the 'king's chamber', whilst Coventry called itself the 'prince's chamber'. Examining the meaning of the metaphor of the chamber, this article provides a new perspective on the way in which cities negotiated their relations with the crown and shows how the chamber became an important aspect of corporate urban identity from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries.

Citation

Liddy, C. (2002). The rhetoric of the royal chamber in late medieval London, York and Coventry. Urban History, 29(3), 323-349. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0963926802003012

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2002-12
Deposit Date May 23, 2008
Publicly Available Date May 23, 2008
Journal Urban History
Print ISSN 0963-9268
Electronic ISSN 1469-8706
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 29
Issue 3
Pages 323-349
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/s0963926802003012
Keywords Metaphor, Urban identity, Monarchy.

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Copyright Statement
© Cambridge University Press 2002






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