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New keratose sponges after the end-Permian extinction provide insights into biotic recoveries.

Wu, Siqi; Reitner, Joachim; Harper, David A T; Yu, Jianxin; Chen, Zhong-Qiang

Authors

Siqi Wu

Joachim Reitner

Jianxin Yu

Zhong-Qiang Chen



Abstract

We challenge the prevailing view that the end-Permian extinction impeded the Triassic evolution of sponges. Here, we report a deep-water community dominated by abundant keratose sponges in the lowest Triassic strata from Southwest China. The sponge fossils occur as dark elliptical imprints in mudstone with distinct oscula on their tops. The structure of preserved fibers suggests closest affinity with the extant Dictyoceratida, an aspiculate demosponge. The exceptional preservation plays a crucial role in retaining their exquisite structures. Sedimentary, taphonomic, pyrite framboid, and trace elemental analyses indicate that the sponges proliferated in an oxygen-poor habitat, demonstrating the high tolerance of sponges to severe conditions. Sponge proliferation is a signal of environmental upheaval but they also stabilized the ecosystem, driving the first phase of biotic recovery after the end-Permian extinction. [Abstract copyright: © 2023 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.]

Citation

Wu, S., Reitner, J., Harper, D. A. T., Yu, J., & Chen, Z. (2024). New keratose sponges after the end-Permian extinction provide insights into biotic recoveries. Geobiology, 22(1), Article e12582. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12582

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Dec 6, 2023
Publication Date Mar 8, 2024
Deposit Date Apr 11, 2024
Journal Geobiology
Print ISSN 1472-4677
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 22
Issue 1
Article Number e12582
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12582
Keywords Biodiversity, Ecosystem, end-Permian extinction, Keratosis, environmental stress, keratose sponge, recovery, Humans, China, Trace Elements, Southwest China, Fossils
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/2314034