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Empire, community, and culture on the Middle Euphrates: Durenes, Palmyrenes, villagers, and soldiers

Kaizer, Ted

Empire, community, and culture on the Middle Euphrates: Durenes, Palmyrenes, villagers, and soldiers Thumbnail


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N. Purcell
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Abstract

The focus of this paper is on the Middle Euphrates: Dura-Europos as its best-known urban settlement; a series of villages known mostly from two papyrological dossiers situated along the river; and the military stations on the Euphrates. The paper asks questions about the impact (or lack of it) of the culture of Palmyra on the region's communities. It is argued that Dura-Europos remains our best case study for social and religious life in a Near Eastern small town under the Roman empire, and that the only evidence that actually makes the town look potentially ‘untypical’ is the idiosyncratic source material related to its Palmyrene inhabitants. The paper also questions the traditional periodization of Dura's history and puts forward the hypothesis that at two points during the so-called ‘Parthian phase’ Palmyrenes took advantage of a power vacuum along the Middle Euphrates and became the dominant military factor in the region.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jun 19, 2017
Online Publication Date Jun 19, 2017
Publication Date Jun 1, 2017
Deposit Date Jun 19, 2017
Publicly Available Date Jun 20, 2017
Journal Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies
Print ISSN 0076-0730
Publisher Oxford University Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 60.1
Pages 63-95
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12048
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1357245
Related Public URLs http://ics.sas.ac.uk/publications/bics-themed-issues/bics-themed-issues-2017-18

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Copyright Statement
This is the accepted version of the following article: Kaizer, Ted (2017) 'Empire, community, and culture on the Middle Euphrates : Durenes, Palmyrenes, villagers, and soldiers.', Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies., 60.1 . pp. 63-95 which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12048. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.






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