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How is television time linked to cardiometabolic health in adults? A critical systematic review of the evidence for an effect of watching television on eating, movement, affect and sleep

Wagnild, J.M.; Pollard, T.M.

How is television time linked to cardiometabolic health in adults? A critical systematic review of the evidence for an effect of watching television on eating, movement, affect and sleep Thumbnail


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Abstract

Objective To improve our understanding of how television (TV) time is linked to cardiometabolic health among adults by systematically and critically evaluating the evidence that watching TV is associated with increased food consumption, lack of movement or negative affect or affects subsequent sleep. Design Systematic review. Data sources Web of Science and PubMed. Eligibility criteria Studies that provided quantitative evidence on short-term associations of watching TV with dietary intake, characteristics of sitting, affect and sleep among samples of healthy adults (≥18 years old). Data extraction and synthesis Study quality was assessed using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Quality Assessment Tools; studies deemed to be of low quality were excluded from the review. Due to heterogeneity of study designs and measurements, the findings were synthesised using narrative summary accompanied by custom plots. Results We identified 31 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Most of the associations reported by the studies included in this review were weak or inconsistent. There was no strong evidence to suggest that food consumption is higher while watching TV than in other contexts or that TV is a particularly ‘sedentary’ behaviour. Affect was less likely to be positive while watching TV than in other contexts but was not more likely to be negative. Two small studies suggest that TV may impact sleep via suppressing melatonin and delaying bedtime. Conclusion There is currently no strong evidence to suggest that TV might impact cardiometabolic health via increasing food consumption, being linked with prolonged/inactive sitting, affect or subsequent sleep. Additional research is required to understand how TV fits within everyday lives and relates to eating, sitting, affect and sleep to improve our understanding of how it might impact cardiometabolic health.

Citation

Wagnild, J., & Pollard, T. (2021). How is television time linked to cardiometabolic health in adults? A critical systematic review of the evidence for an effect of watching television on eating, movement, affect and sleep. BMJ Open, 11, Article e040739. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040739

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Apr 17, 2021
Online Publication Date May 5, 2021
Publication Date 2021-05
Deposit Date May 7, 2021
Publicly Available Date Dec 15, 2021
Journal BMJ Open
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 11
Article Number e040739
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040739

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Copyright Statement
This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial.






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