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Same storm, different boats: the impact of COVID-19 on Black students and academic staff in UK and US higher education

Arday, Jason; Jones, Christopher

Same storm, different boats: the impact of COVID-19 on Black students and academic staff in UK and US higher education Thumbnail


Authors

Jason Arday



Abstract

The permanence of systemic racism in the UK and USA means that Black people are disadvantaged in myriad ways, including within the Academy. While the disproportionate impact of COVID-19, alongside the Black Lives Matter movement, has increased awareness of the challenges faced by Black communities, these issues remain, both in and beyond higher education. Furthermore, there is still a paucity of research individualising the experiences of Black people, who are often homogenised with other ethnic minority groups. This paper explores the impact of COVID-19 on UK and US Black students and academic staff, utilising a critical race theory (CRT) framework. Analysis revealed that Black students and staff experienced COVID-19 against the backdrop of racism as a “pandemic within a pandemic” (Laurencin and Walker, Cell Systems 11:9–10, 2020), including racial (re)traumatisation, loneliness and isolation. Other themes included precarious employment and exploitation. Recommendations are offered for penetrative interventions that can support Black students and staff in the wake of strained race relations neglecting their adverse experiences and a global pandemic.

Citation

Arday, J., & Jones, C. (2022). Same storm, different boats: the impact of COVID-19 on Black students and academic staff in UK and US higher education. Higher Education, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-022-00939-0

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Oct 4, 2022
Online Publication Date Oct 25, 2022
Publication Date Oct 25, 2022
Deposit Date Jan 9, 2023
Publicly Available Date Jan 9, 2023
Journal Higher Education
Print ISSN 0018-1560
Electronic ISSN 1573-174X
Publisher Springer
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-022-00939-0
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1183906

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Published Journal Article (Online first) (753 Kb)
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Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright Statement
Online first This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.





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