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Violations of Personal Space in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Insights from the Social Responsiveness Scale

Lough, E.; Hanley, M.; Rodgers, J.; South, M.; Kirk, H.; Kennedy, D.; Riby, D.M.

Violations of Personal Space in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Insights from the Social Responsiveness Scale Thumbnail


Authors

E. Lough

J. Rodgers

M. South

H. Kirk

D. Kennedy



Abstract

Interpersonal distance regulation is crucial for successful social interactions. We investigated personal space awareness in Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to typical development. Parents reported that individuals with WS and ASD were significantly more likely than those developing typically to invade the personal space of others. WS individuals were reported to have the least awareness of the personal space boundaries of others. Despite the suggested opposing social profiles of WS and ASD, some similarities are present in the ability, or indeed inability, to regulate interpersonal distance during social interactions. Findings are discussed in relation to implications of atypical amygdala function, inhibitory control and anxiety on real-world behaviour for such socially vulnerable groups.

Citation

Lough, E., Hanley, M., Rodgers, J., South, M., Kirk, H., Kennedy, D., & Riby, D. (2015). Violations of Personal Space in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Insights from the Social Responsiveness Scale. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(12), 4101-4108. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2536-0

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jul 24, 2015
Online Publication Date Jul 24, 2015
Publication Date 2015-12
Deposit Date Jul 29, 2015
Publicly Available Date Jul 24, 2016
Journal Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Print ISSN 0162-3257
Electronic ISSN 1573-3432
Publisher Springer
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 45
Issue 12
Pages 4101-4108
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2536-0
Keywords Personal space, Social distance, Autism, Williams syndrome, Social behaviour.

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