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Scrapbooking men's intrusions: ‘It's nice to have a place where you can rant about things that people normally tell you you're over-reacting about’

Walling-Wefelmeyer, Ros

Scrapbooking men's intrusions: ‘It's nice to have a place where you can rant about things that people normally tell you you're over-reacting about’ Thumbnail


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Abstract

This article presents an in-depth study of eight women's experiences and conceptions of men's intrusions in the UK. ‘Men's intrusions’ is posited here as a useful concept for exploring a lived continuum of men's practices in and across digital, online and offline space. Typically, research on men's intrusions has focused on specific and bounded space, neglecting the interrelation and collapse of sites and spaces into each other. This paper addresses this omission and finds that participants experienced a wide range of complex, multi-faceted intrusions, all unique, but sharing the common characteristics of being simultaneously unexpected and continuous, and of imposing gendered-self-awareness with lasting negative effect. In the process of making sense of their experiences, participants adopted different frames for conceptualising men's intrusions, three of which were identified: an individual frame, a grey frame and feminist frame/s. This sense-making process was largely facilitated by the activity of scrapbooking; the research used analogue and digital scrapbooking methodologically to represent diverse intrusions occurring across diverse mediums. The findings have implications for both developing and complicating understandings of the continuum of men's violence against women and also for diversifying feminist research approaches to gender, space and violence.

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jun 24, 2019
Online Publication Date Jul 10, 2019
Publication Date Aug 31, 2019
Deposit Date Jul 17, 2019
Publicly Available Date Jul 17, 2019
Journal Women's Studies International Forum
Print ISSN 0277-5395
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 75
Article Number 102242
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2019.102242
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1297688

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