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Using Music in Primary Schools to Improve Learning Outcomes

Rowell, Dean

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Authors

Dean Rowell d.a.rowell@durham.ac.uk
PGR Student Master of Arts



Contributors

Abstract

My paper presents an argument that the greater involvement of music in primary schools could essentially be of great benefit to young children, both in their behavioural skills and potentially contribute to an initiative to improve academic skills generally. Moreover, there has been consistent evidence established by research that music included in schools, could contribute to a greater sense of well-being amongst pupils which is linked to a possible improvement in academic performance. My methodological approach has been an exploration of the context of music in primary schools evaluating results published in this field of study. My current research shows that there are questions to be raised regarding the lack of music in primary schools and that there is evidence that substantiates that there is a connection between children engaging with music and pupil achievement such as numeracy and literacy skills within a pedagogical context. This has implications for establishing educational policy for teaching music within primary schools.

Citation

Rowell, D. (2021). Using Music in Primary Schools to Improve Learning Outcomes. In S. Riddle, & P. Bhatia (Eds.), Imagining Better Education: Conference Proceedings 2020 (121-136)

Presentation Conference Type Conference Paper (Published)
Conference Name Imagining Better Education 2020
Acceptance Date Dec 1, 2021
Publication Date 2021
Deposit Date Aug 4, 2021
Publicly Available Date Aug 4, 2021
Pages 121-136
Series Title Imagining Better Education
Book Title Imagining Better Education: Conference Proceedings 2020
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1139143
Publisher URL https://www.durham.ac.uk/departments/academic/education/

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