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Austerity, political control and supplier selection in English local government: implications for autonomy in multi-level systems

Eckersley, P.; Flynn, A.; Ferry, L.; Lakoma, K.

Austerity, political control and supplier selection in English local government: implications for autonomy in multi-level systems Thumbnail


Authors

P. Eckersley

A. Flynn

K. Lakoma



Abstract

Analysis of 60,000 contracts awarded by English councils between 2015-19 reveals that austerity constraints are a key predictor of councils outsourcing services to for-profit suppliers, regardless of their political control. Conservative Party-controlled councils are also more likely to contract with for-profit suppliers, although we found no link between Labour-controlled councils and not-for-profit suppliers, nor evidence that political or budgetary factors influence whether councils contract with providers based in their own region. We argue that centrally imposed funding cuts, and a belief that for-profit suppliers represent a cheaper option, could be overriding Labour Party councils’ ideological preference for not-for-profit providers.

Citation

Eckersley, P., Flynn, A., Ferry, L., & Lakoma, K. (2023). Austerity, political control and supplier selection in English local government: implications for autonomy in multi-level systems. Public Management Review, 25(1), 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2021.1930122

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date May 4, 2021
Online Publication Date Jun 1, 2021
Publication Date 2023
Deposit Date May 4, 2021
Publicly Available Date Mar 1, 2023
Journal Public Management Review
Print ISSN 1471-9037
Publisher Taylor and Francis Group
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 25
Issue 1
Pages 1-21
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2021.1930122
Public URL https://durham-repository.worktribe.com/output/1248810

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Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright Statement
© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.







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