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The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily

Hawkins, T.J.; Deeks, M.J.; Wang, P.; Hussey, P.J.

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Authors

M.J. Deeks

P. Wang



Abstract

The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species.

Citation

Hawkins, T., Deeks, M., Wang, P., & Hussey, P. (2014). The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily. Frontiers in Plant Science, 5, Article 254. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2014.00254

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date May 19, 2014
Online Publication Date Jun 5, 2014
Publication Date Jun 5, 2014
Deposit Date Jan 28, 2015
Publicly Available Date Jul 28, 2015
Journal Frontiers in Plant Science
Publisher Frontiers Media
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 5
Article Number 254
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2014.00254

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Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright Statement
© 2014 Hawkins, Deeks, Wang and Hussey. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.







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