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Social stress in young people with specific language impairment

Wadman, R.; Durkin, K.; Conti-Ramsden, G.

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Authors

R. Wadman

K. Durkin

G. Conti-Ramsden



Abstract

Social interactions can be a source of social stress for adolescents. Little is known about how adolescents with developmental difficulties, such as specific language impairment (SLI), feel when interacting socially. Participants included 28 adolescents with SLI and 28 adolescents with typical language abilities (TL). Self-report measures of social stress, social skills and social acceptance were obtained. Participants with SLI reported experiencing significantly more social stress than did participants with TL. Both groups judged themselves as having adequate social skills and positive social acceptance. Expressive language ability was negatively associated with social stress, but did not predict social stress when social factors were included in the regression model. Perceived social skills and social acceptance scores predicted social stress, in that poorer scores predicted more social stress. Despite perceiving themselves as having adequate social skills and as being socially accepted, social interactions are nonetheless a source of stress for adolescents with SLI.

Citation

Wadman, R., Durkin, K., & Conti-Ramsden, G. (2011). Social stress in young people with specific language impairment. Journal of Adolescence, 34(3), 421-431. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2010.06.010

Journal Article Type Article
Online Publication Date Jul 22, 2010
Publication Date Jun 1, 2011
Deposit Date Jan 18, 2016
Publicly Available Date Jun 14, 2016
Journal Journal of Adolescence
Print ISSN 0140-1971
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 34
Issue 3
Pages 421-431
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2010.06.010

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Copyright Statement
NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Adolescence. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Adolescence, 34, 3, June 2011, 10.1016/j.adolescence.2010.06.010.



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