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Wage Exploitation and the Nonworseness Claim: Allowing the Wrong, to Do More Good

Faraci, David

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Abstract

Many believe that employment can be wrongfully exploitative, even if it is consensual and mutually beneficial. At the same time, it may seem third parties should not do anything to preclude or eliminate such arrangements, given these same considerations of consent and benefit. I argue that there are perfectly sensible, intuitive ethical positions that vindicate this “Reasonable View.” The view requires such defense because the literature often suggests that there is no theoretical space for it. I respond to arguments for the clearest symptom of this obscuration: the so-called nonworseness claim that a consensual, mutually beneficial transaction cannot be “morally worse” than its absence. In addition to making space for the Reasonable View, this serves my dialectical goal of encouraging distinct attention to first- and third-party obligations.

Citation

Faraci, D. (2019). Wage Exploitation and the Nonworseness Claim: Allowing the Wrong, to Do More Good. Business Ethics Quarterly, 29(2), 169-188. https://doi.org/10.1017/beq.2018.28

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jul 24, 2018
Online Publication Date Jan 4, 2019
Publication Date Apr 30, 2019
Deposit Date Nov 13, 2018
Publicly Available Date Nov 14, 2018
Journal Business Ethics Quarterly
Print ISSN 1052-150X
Electronic ISSN 2153-3326
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 29
Issue 2
Pages 169-188
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/beq.2018.28

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Copyright Statement
This article has been published in a revised form in Business ethics quarterly https://doi.org/10.1017/beq.2018.28. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © Society for Business Ethics





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